Aggregate Definition and Meaning: What Does Aggregate Mean?

Aggregate Definition

ag·gre·gate  (gr-gt)

adj.

1. Constituting or amounting to a whole; total: aggregate sales in that market.

2. Botany Crowded or massed into a dense cluster.

3. Composed of a mixture of minerals separable by mechanical means.

n.

1. A total considered with reference to its constituent parts; a gross amount: "An empire is the aggregate of many states under one common head" (Edmund Burke).

2. The mineral materials, such as sand or stone, used in making concrete.

v. (-gt) ag·gre·gat·ed, ag·gre·gat·ing, ag·gre·gates

v.tr.

1. To gather into a mass, sum, or whole.

2. To amount to; total.

v.intr.

To come together or collect in a mass or whole: "Some [bacteria]aggregate so closely as to mimic a multicellular organism" (Gina Kolata).

Idiom:

in the aggregate

Taken into account as a whole: Unit sales for December amounted in the aggregate to 100,000.


aggregate

adj [ˈægrɪgɪt -ˌgeɪt]

1. formed of separate units collected into a whole; collective; corporate

2. (Life Sciences & Allied Applications / Botany) (of fruits and flowers) composed of a dense cluster of carpels or florets

n [ˈægrɪgɪt -ˌgeɪt]

1. a sum or assemblage of many separate units; sum total

2. (Earth Sciences / Geological Science) Geology a rock, such as granite, consisting of a mixture of minerals

3. (Miscellaneous Technologies / Building) the sand and stone mixed with cement and water to make concrete

4. (Life Sciences & Allied Applications / Botany) a group of closely related biotypes produced by apomixis, such as brambles, which are the Rubus fruticosus aggregate

in the aggregate taken as a whole

vb [ˈægrɪˌgeɪt]

1. to combine or be combined into a body, etc.

2. (tr) to amount to (a number)

[from Latin aggregāre to add to a flock or herd, attach (oneself) to, from grex flock]

aggregately  adv

aggregative  [ˈægrɪˌgeɪtɪv] adj


Noun.

1.

aggregate - the whole amount

total, totality, sum

whole, unit - an assemblage of parts that is regarded as a single entity; "how big is that part compared to the whole?"; "the team is a unit"

2.

aggregate - material such as sand or gravel used with cement and water to make concrete, mortar, or plaster

material, stuff - the tangible substance that goes into the makeup of a physical object; "coal is a hard black material"; "wheat is the stuff they use to make bread"

3.

aggregate - a sum total of many heterogenous things taken together

congeries, conglomeration

plankton - the aggregate of small plant and animal organisms that float or drift in great numbers in fresh or salt water

nekton - the aggregate of actively swimming animals in a body of water ranging from microscopic organisms to whales

sum total, summation, sum - the final aggregate; "the sum of all our troubles did not equal the misery they suffered"

Verb.

1.

aggregate - amount in the aggregate to

add up, amount, come - develop into; "This idea will never amount to anything"; "nothing came of his grandiose plans"

2.

aggregate - gather in a mass, sum, or whole

combine

unitise, unitize - make into a unit; "unitize a car body"

amalgamate, commix, mingle, unify, mix - to bring or combine together or with something else; "resourcefully he mingled music and dance"

Adj.

1.

aggregate - formed of separate units gathered into a mass or whole; "aggregate expenses include expenses of all divisions combined for the entire year"; "the aggregated amount of indebtedness"

aggregated, aggregative, mass

collective - forming a whole or aggregate

2.

aggregate - composed of a dense cluster of separate units such as carpels or florets or drupelets; "raspberries are aggregate fruits"

phytology, botany - the branch of biology that studies plants

multiple - having or involving or consisting of more than one part or entity or individual; "multiple birth"; "multiple ownership"; "made multiple copies of the speech"; "his multiple achievements in public life"; "her multiple personalities"; "a pineapple is a multiple fruit"


aggregate

noun

total, body, whole, amount, collection, mass, sum, combination, pile, mixture, bulk, lump, heap, accumulation, assemblage, agglomeration society viewed as an aggregate of individuals

adjective

collective, added, mixed, combined, collected, corporate, assembled, accumulated, composite, cumulative the rate of growth of aggregate demand

verb

combine, mix, collect, assemble, heap, accumulate, pile, amass We should never aggregate votes to predict results under another system.



Definition of AGGREGATE

: formed by the collection of units or particles into a body, mass, or amount : collective: as

a (1) : clustered in a dense mass or head <an aggregate flower> (2) : formed from several separate ovaries of a single flower <aggregate fruit>

b : composed of mineral crystals of one or more kinds or of mineral rock fragments

c : taking all units as a whole <aggregate sales>

ag·gre·gate·ly adverb

ag·gre·gate·ness noun



Examples of AGGREGATE

  1. The university receives more than half its aggregate income from government sources.

  2. The team with the highest aggregate score wins.

  3. There were to be thirty-seven playgrounds, twenty schools. There were to be a hundred and thirty-three miles of street, paved with an inch and a half of No. 2 macadam on an aggregate base. —Joan Didion, New Yorker, 26 July 1993

  4. The Web site aggregates content from many other sites.

  5. <over time, her petty thefts aggregated a significant shortfall in the company's books>

  6. The problem, in this case, is that the synergy creates incentives for segregation. Ethnic advertisers scour the TV schedule for shows and channels that “aggregate” viewers of the type the client wants to reach … —Tamar Jacoby, New Republic, 24 Jan. 2000

  7. “We are good at aggregating eyeballs and delivering services,” says Barry Schuler, the president of AOL Interactive Services, “and the Time Warner deal is a natural extension of that.” —Barry Schuler, Fortune, 7 Feb. 2000

  8. Pollsters, for the most part, know perfectly well what they are doing. One thing they are doing is aggregating and averaging ephemeral spasms of “mood” that may have commercial or political value. —Christopher Hitchens, Harper's, April 1992

  9. … covered only if each of the corporations involved has capital, surplus and undivided profits aggregating more than $10 million… —Joe Sims et al., National Law Journal, 28 Jan. 1991



Origin of AGGREGATE

Middle English aggregat, from Latin aggregatus, past participle of aggregare to add to, from ad- + greg-, grex flock

First Known Use: 15th century


Definition of AGGREGATE

1

: a mass or body of units or parts somewhat loosely associated with one another

2

: the whole sum or amount : sum total

3

a : a rock composed of mineral crystals of one or more kinds or of mineral rock fragments : an aggregate rock

b : any of several hard inert materials (as sand, gravel, or slag) used for mixing with a cementing material to form concrete, mortar, or plaster

c : a clustered mass of individual soil particles varied in shape, ranging in size from a microscopic granule to a small crumb, and considered the basic structural unit of soil

ADJECTIVE:

Constituting or amounting to a whole; total: aggregate sales in that market.

Botany Crowded or massed into a dense cluster.

Composed of a mixture of minerals separable by mechanical means.

NOUN:

A total considered with reference to its constituent parts; a gross amount: "An empire is the aggregate of many states under one common head" (Edmund Burke).

The mineral materials, such as sand or stone, used in making concrete.

VERB:

ag·gre·gat·ed, ag·gre·gat·ing, ag·gre·gates (-gt)

VERB:

tr.

To gather into a mass, sum, or whole.

To amount to; total.

VERB:

intr.

To come together or collect in a mass or whole: "Some [bacteria]aggregate so closely as to mimic a multicellular organism" (Gina Kolata).

IDIOM:

in the aggregate

Taken into account as a whole: Unit sales for December amounted in the aggregate to 100,000.

ETYMOLOGY:

Middle English aggregat, from Latin aggregtus, past participle of aggregre, to add to : ad-, ad- + gregre, to collect (from grex, greg-, flock; see ger- in Indo-European roots)

OTHER FORMS:

aggre·gate·ly(Adverb), aggre·gation(Noun), aggre·gative(Adjective), aggre·gator(Noun)


Aggregate Meaning

noun

Pronunciation: /ˈagrɪgət/

  • 1a whole formed by combining several separate elements: the council was an aggregate of three regional assemblies

  • the total score of a player or team in a fixture comprising more than one game or round: he set the pace with a one-over-par aggregate of 151 [mass noun]: the result put the sides level on aggregate

  • 2a material or structure formed from a mass of fragments or particles loosely compacted together: the specimen is an aggregate of rock and mineral fragments

  • [mass noun] pieces of broken or crushed stone or gravel used to make concrete and in building: use aggregate for the first layer when filling the trench


Aggregate Sentence Examples

  • Aggregate the statistics across the whole class.

  • Tarmac aggregate operate on a 5 hectare site dedicated to the import of marine dredged aggregate.

  • There are limits to the quantities of certain materials allowed within recycled aggregates for capping.

  • Aggregates extraction.

  • In appendix a, the distinction is made between 'spatially detailed' and 'spatially aggregate' forms of transport model.

  • The site at Bridgend includes Ewenny Quarry which provide an "in house" supply of limestone aggregates.

  • Aggregated data.

  • This is seen as a possible future way of recycling waste glass and at the same time reducing the demand for quarried aggregates.

  • Made from clay, ceramics or refractory concrete consisting of pumice or kiln burnt aggregate bonded with high alumina cement.

  • Aggregates levy', sept 2003.

  • The change in color was accompanied by a buildup of defective protein aggregates inside the cells.

  • Aggregated single score for each submission will be used to provide a rank order of all submissions returned to the panel.

  • Of course Weber was right in terms of operating policy - the ECB does not target a monetary aggregate.

  • Aggregate burthen of 1639 tons.

  • The company is also aware that contractors disposing of construction waste require virgin aggregate.

  • Aggregate statistics for the areas of town center activity defined on the maps held on the cd.

  • This is the change in conformation that is associated with protease resistance and the accumulation of insoluble aggregates of prion protein.

  • Aggregate demand increase or decrease?

  • The type of coarse aggregate used included normal-weight calcareous and siliceous, and lightweight.

  • Aggregate score will be taken of both teams.

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