State Abbreviations List of USA States

The United States is comprised of fifty states and a national capital district, as well as a number of territories and possessions around the world.  Because their names are commonly used and some of them are fairly long, they are often abbreviated in written documents and on mailing addresses.

StateAbbreviations.us features a table of U.S. States, Districts, Territories, and Possessions, along with their standard and postal service abbreviations and their state capitals.  Each State name contains an active link to its official state government website.  Each row of the State table also includes access to a state map.  Each District, Territory, or Possession name contains an active link to its official government or tourism website.  To find state locations, view the state abbreviations map, which shows the lower 48 states plus Alaska and Hawaii, plus their two-letter postal abbreviations.  Click on the illustration at right for a simplified view of the 50 states and their postal abbreviations.

US State Abbreviations - State Capitals - State Links

US States, Capitals, and Government Links

State

Standard
Abbreviation

Postal
Abbreviation

Capital City

Alabama

Ala.

AL

Montgomery

Alaska

Alaska

AK

Juneau

Arizona

Ariz.

AZ

Phoenix

Arkansas

Ark.

AR

Little Rock

California

Calif.

CA

Sacramento

Colorado

Colo.

CO

Denver

Connecticut

Conn.

CT

Hartford

Delaware

Del.

DE

Dover

Florida

Fla.

FL

Tallahassee

Georgia

Ga.

GA

Atlanta

Hawaii

Hawaii

HI

Honolulu

Idaho

Idaho

ID

Boise

Illinois

Ill.

IL

Springfield

Indiana

Ind.

IN

Indianapolis

Iowa

Iowa

IA

Des Moines

Kansas

Kans.

KS

Topeka

Kentucky

Ky.

KY

Frankfort

Louisiana

La.

LA

Baton Rouge

Maine

Maine

ME

Augusta

Maryland

Md.

MD

Annapolis

Massachusetts

Mass.

MA

Boston

Michigan

Mich.

MI

Lansing

Minnesota

Minn.

MN

St. Paul

Mississippi

Miss.

MS

Jackson

Missouri

Mo.

MO

Jefferson City

Montana

Mont.

MT

Helena

Nebraska

Nebr.

NE

Lincoln

Nevada

Nev.

NV

Carson City

New Hampshire

N.H.

NH

Concord

New Jersey

N.J.

NJ

Trenton

New Mexico

N.M.

NM

Santa Fe

New York

N.Y.

NY

Albany

North Carolina

N.C.

NC

Raleigh

North Dakota

N.D.

ND

Bismarck

Ohio

Ohio

OH

Columbus

Oklahoma

Okla.

OK

Oklahoma City

Oregon

Ore.

OR

Salem

Pennsylvania

Pa.

PA

Harrisburg

Rhode Island

R.I.

RI

Providence

South Carolina

S.C.

SC

Columbia

South Dakota

S.D.

SD

Pierre

Tennessee

Tenn.

TN

Nashville

Texas

Tex.

TX

Austin

Utah

Utah

UT

Salt Lake City

Vermont

Vt.

VT

Montpelier

Virginia

Va.

VA

Richmond

Washington

Wash.

WA

Olympia

West Virginia

W.Va.

WV

Charleston

Wisconsin

Wis.

WI

Madison

Wyoming

Wyo.

WY

Cheyenne

US District, Territory, and Possession Abbreviations and Capitals

US Districts, Territories, and Possessions

Subdivision

Standard
Abbreviation

Postal
Abbreviation

Capital City

American Samoa

n/a

AS

Pago Pago

District of Columbia

D.C.

DC

Washington

Federated States of Micronesia

FSM

FM

Palikir

Guam

Guam

GU

Hagatna

Marshall Islands

n/a

MH

Majuro

Northern Mariana Islands

n/a

MP

Saipan

Palau

Palau

PW

Koror

Puerto Rico

P.R.

PR

San Juan

Virgin Islands

V.I.

VI

Charlotte Amalie

The standard, or traditional, abbreviations, were widely used on mailing addresses and in other contexts before the two-letter postal abbreviations were introduced.  Use the standard state abbreviations, with periods and spaces as shown, for all purposes other than postal addresses.  The United States Post Office instituted two letter state abbreviations along with five digit zip codes in 1963.  These postal abbreviations should only be used in mailing addresses.  When abbreviating the name of a state in a mailing address, use uppercase letters, with no space between the letters.

The United States of America is country located in North America in the Western Hemisphere. The USA consists of fifty individual states and one federal district, the capital, Washington D.C. Forty-eight of the states are contiguous, meaning connected.

Alaska is not directly connected to the other forty-eight states, but still located on the same continent, separated by part of Canada from the rest of the lower forty-eight. Alaska is part of the continental United States, but not the contiguous United States.
Hawaii, located far out in the Pacific Ocean, is not connected to any of the states, and is not part of the contiguous or continental United States.
Each of the states has its own state-level government, but the states are unified, falling under the federal government that governs all fifty states, and is headed by the President of the United States.

State

Abbreviation

Alabama

AL

Alaska

AK

Arizona

AZ

Arkansas

AR

California

CA

Colorado

CO

Connecticut

CT

Delaware

DE

Florida

FL

Georgia

GA

Hawaii

HI

Idaho

ID

Illinois

IL

Indiana

IN

Iowa

IA

Kansas

KS

Kentucky

KY

State

Abbreviation

Louisiana

LA

Maine

ME

Maryland

MD

Massachusetts

MA

Michigan

MI

Minnesota

MN

Mississippi

MS

Missouri

MO

Montana

MT

Nebraska

NE

Nevada

NV

New Hampshire

NH

New Jersey

NJ

New Mexico

NM

New York

NY

North Carolina

NC

North Dakota

ND

State

Abbreviation

Ohio

OH

Oklahoma

OK

Oregon

OR

Pennsylvania

PA

Rhode Island

RI

South Carolina

SC

South Dakota

SD

Tennessee

TN

Texas

TX

Utah

UT

Vermont

VT

Virginia

VA

Washington

WA

West Virginia

WV

Wisconsin

WI

Wyoming

WY

 


The United States of America, the third largest country by size in the world, is a nation of staggering natural, geological, and cultural diversity. Occupying the middle portion of the North American continent, the country's varied landscapes run the gamut from tropical beaches in Florida to alpine peaks in the Rocky Mountains, from rolling prairie lands and barren deserts in the West to dense wilderness areas in the Northeast and Northwest. Interspersed throughout are some of the world's largest lakes, deepest canyons, mightiest rivers, and most populous cities.

Though a relatively young nation, the United States has enjoyed a meteoritic rise in global importance since declaring independence from Britain in 1776. Advances in the past hundred years in particular have established America as a world leader economically, militarily, and technologically.

The U.S. is generally divided into six large regions: New England; the mid-Atlantic; the South; the Midwest; the Southwest, and the West. Though loosely defined, these zones tend to share important similarities, including climate, culture, history, and geography.

New England hosted some of the first settlers in the New World. These intrepid travelers left Europe, mainly England, in search of religious freedom. Their thrift and ingenuity created an intellectual, cultural, and economic epicenter in the region that lasted nearly 200 years. Visitors flock to the states of New England—Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont—for, among other things, a dose of American history and for the world-famous explosion of colors from the region's fall foliage.

The mid-Atlantic region includes Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Washington, D.C. These 19th-century industrial powerhouses attracted millions of European immigrants and gave rise to some of the East Coast's largest cities: New York, Baltimore, and Philadelphia. They're also home to some of the most picturesque scenery in the nation, including the ancient peaks of the Appalachians and the tranquil Chesapeake Bay.

The South comprises Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. This most distinctive of U.S. regions took decades to recover from the devastation of the Civil War. But over the past half-century, a so-called New South has emerged, supplementing its agricultural base with modern manufacturing and industry and attracting a flock of transplants and retirees to its mild climate, laid-back lifestyle, and varied landscapes.

The American Midwest is perhaps most difficult to define culturally and geographically. Home to the Great Lakes and much of the mighty Mississippi River, the highly fertile soils in the Midwest make it the country's agricultural epicenter. Dubbed the "nation's breadbasket," the region comprises the states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.

Starkly beautiful landscapes define the America Southwest. A land of prairie and desert, the Southwest is made up of Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas, although parts of neighboring states are often considered part of this region. The Southwest is home to some of the world's great natural marvels, including the Grand Canyon and Carlsbad Caverns, and many manmade wonders as well, like the ruins of the Chaco culture.

The American West, home of rolling plains and the iconic cowboy, epitomizes the pioneering image of the United States. But this region is a profoundly diverse one, ranging from endless wilderness to barren desert, coral reefs to Arctic tundra, Hollywood to Yellowstone. The states of the West include Alaska, Colorado, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.

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